Adoption Network Law Center

Adoption Network Law Center Adoption agencies and authorities, support groups and families need to encourage everyone involved in this process to advocate for and live by a few simple style guidelines that would foster more accurate, objective and respectful coverage of adoptive families in the media and in society at large. The problem is widespread. Think back to recent media coverage. For example, many obituaries of...
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ANLC

ANLC It would be easy to update journalistic language regarding adoption, much in the way that journalists eliminated unnecessary qualifiers for race or gender. Specific suggestions for change as it relates to the media: 1) As in the case of race or gender, the fact a person was adopted should be mentioned only if it is absolutely essential to the story. If it is mentioned, the relevance must be...
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Adoption Network

Adoption Network Parents with an adopted child wonder whether, when, and how to tell their child that he or she is adopted. They also want to know if adopted children face special problems or challenges. Child and adolescent psychiatrists recommend that the child be told about the adoption by the adoptive parents. Children should be told about their adoption in a way that they can understand. There are two...
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Adoption Network Law Center

Adoption Network Law Center 5) Children also should not be referred to as abandoned or unwanted, unless they were actually found abandoned. Sociological or legal factors often force birth parents to relinquish their parental rights and make a child available for adoption; that is very different from abandoning them or “giving them up.” In the interest of accuracy, birth parents can be said to have placed the...
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